Feeds:
Posts
Comments

beautifulwreck300x300

“A deeply personal account of the difficulties faced by people suffering from mental illness… Schroeder’s brutally honest memoir reveals the extraordinary effort required to take control of one’s mental and emotional health.” -Publishers Weekly

“A riveting and painfully honest account, Beautiful Wreck not only demonstrates the importance of humor and perseverance in the face of mental illness, but also affirms the power of self-reinvention.” -Kaitlin Bell Barnett, author of Dosed: The Medication Generation Grows Up

“I highly recommend this candid memoir, particularly for Schroeder’s strong voice that successfully balances life’s darkest moments with humor.” -Persephone Magazine

“Brave and relentless, a courage to do it all that astounds one. To write it all down. But that is what I have come to expect from Stephanie Schroeder. I have known her some 25 years and watched what she has done with her life: journalism, law; wonderful what she has been through; to hell and back again. A survivor. Always with a sense of humor, a jauntiness that says to hell with ordinary opinion.”  -Kate Millett, author of Sexual Politics

Written with humor, insight, perception, courage–a much needed work from a talented writer.” -Joan Nestle, activist, archivist & author of A Restricted Country and A Fragile Union

The memoir is now de rigeur, a rite of passage for middle-aged writers. To make one’s story stand out, it must stand up—to scrutiny, to deconstruction, to other people’s revisionism. Beautiful Wreck stands up—it’s the raw, honest, balls out (ovaries out?), in-your-face lesbian version of James Frey’s A Million Little Pieces without the lying and posturing. Schroeder takes us, in real time and retrospectively, on the trip through “comfort suicide”—the belief that death can be an answer to depression. She explicates how normative emotional pain so severe it makes you want to die can become. Fortunately, three attempts with no success were the charm; that dark round-trip down the river Styx brings Schroeder back irrevocably to life at its deepest, fullest and most inspirational. This is what survival is, and Schroeder lays it bare. -Victoria A. Brownworth, award-winning author, Too Queer: Essays from a Radical Life and Coming Out of Cancer

HEADCASE: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer Writers & Artists on Mental Illness

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS. 

rocks in my pockets poster image

The phenomenal animated feature “Rocks In My Pockets” is debuting on VOD & DVD January 29! Be the first among your family and friend to see this exceptional movie – check in here to http://ykr.be/lcl6hb8ls pre-order both rentals and purchases of the film.

Happy New Year!

EV007243

Boston area folks!

Wildlight productions“Kings Park: Stories from an American Mental Institution” will screen in Arlington at the Regent Theatre on the morning of Friday October 10th, at 9:30 am, at the Mad in America International Film Festival. Director Lucy winer will be there for a Q&A after the screening! Below is more info about the festival, a description of the film, as well as a link to the new trailer.

“King’s Park” trailer

imageof-bottle-of-pillsI had a really bad week: stomach pain, nausea, diarrhea, and really thick brain fog. I thought maybe I was getting the flu, but my symptoms didn’t mature into flu and I couldn’t understand why brain fog would be a part the deal.

I was looking at my situation trying to figure it out, and thought to myself, “Wow, this really feels like transitioning onto a new medication.” And then it occurred to me: I had been taking a different generic Lamictal than my usual Teva. Yeah, I know some folks hate Teva with a passion, but it’s what I started with a decade ago and remains very good to me.

I also know many doctors and pharmacists tell us all the time that all generics are equal – they are not. This is, I believe, a major reason so many of us who want to try to maintain a steady medication regime have horrible side-effects, adverse reactions, and generally bad experiences with various medications: the crummy generics and constant switching of brands every time we refill a script.

Thankfully found in my cupboard a partial bottle of Teva brand Lamotrigine. But, I was so sick from the shitty “Lamictal” I wasted an entire day sleeping off the horrid effects of the other stuff.

Feeling much better now.

Standing on the precipice of tipping over into a half-century of living, I joyfully look forward to my 51st birthday on September 10th, which also marks World Suicide Prevention Day.

It’s been nine solid years years since I stopped my repeated attempts to kill myself. I am happier now than ever. A young friend is here from Australia via Toronto to celebrate, and, with my girlfriend, prepare a birthday dinner for a fun, private evening.

 

anniversarybook11But, I still can remember when I was in the slough of despond for so many long years. I remember how it was to feel helpless and in dangerous despair. I never want to go there again. The good news is I no longer find myself in the very dark spaces I once occupied. In fact, I feel very distanced from that person who was not-me for 42 years.

More here: World Suicide Prevention Day and Me | Fifty is the New Fifty.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 110 other followers